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Why My Siblings Are the Ones I Talk to About Sex

siblings, sex education
By , 15, Staff Writer Originally Published: June 13, 2018 Revised: June 13, 2018

Writing for Sex, Etc.

Cynthia was the first person in my family to write for Sex, Etc. She discovered Sexetc.org while doing research for a health project and decided to apply because she had always loved writing and wanted to spread knowledge about sexual health issues. “This was an incredible opportunity to advocate for better education and empower young people like us,” says Cynthia.

My brother applied after seeing the opportunities and great experiences my sister had had. “Seeing the impact that Sex, Etc. had on my sister—and teenagers everywhere—inspired me to get involved,” says Adrian. “I wanted to make a difference. Sex, Etc. showed me how important it was to communicate about these issues.”

…it’s important to have a range of resources and people you can go to when you have questions about sex and sexuality

And me? I joined because of how much it had changed my siblings: not just the way they wrote, but also the amount of knowledge and perspective they gained about sex and sexuality.

Role Models

I had different types of questions for my sister. Cynthia says, “I love talking to my brothers about dating and relationships because I want to hear who they’re interested in. I get to offer advice from my point of view as a girl. It’s so fun!” One time, I wanted to approach a cute girl in my biology class. But I had lots of questions. Was she interested in me? How should I go up to her? What do I say? I didn’t have much experience talking to girls, and I felt insecure about all the acne on my face. So I went to my sister for advice.

“I reminded Nathan of how awesome he was. Just be yourself and take it easy,” she now says. “Talking to a girl is just like talking to a friend.” Hearing this gave me confidence. I like going to my sister with these sorts of questions because I can trust her to keep a secret.

Bottom Line

I felt the most comfortable talking to my siblings about sex because they were always open and gave me reliable advice. But it doesn’t have to be a sibling—it can be an older friend or someone you trust who has more experience or knowledge. In the end, it’s important to have a range of resources and people you can go to when you have questions about sex and sexuality. Just knowing that you’re not alone and that there are others who have gone through the same experiences can make a huge difference.

Use our Communication Tool and find more ways to start important conversations with people in your life.

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